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The Bartender's Blog
Thursday, 8 February 2007
jello-shots
Here are some other popular liquor and Jello flavor combinations:

Orange and cherry are Jello flavors that work well with Brandy.

You can match fruit flavored liquor with fruit flavored Jello.

Lime Jello with tequila and Triple Sec

Orange jello with orange cognac and brandy (such as Grand Marnier) or peach Schnapps

Unflavored gelatin with Coca Cola and rum

Cranberry Jello with vodka

Cherry Jello with cherry brandy

Raspberry jello with raspberry Schnapps

Tropical fruit Jello (or unflavored gelatin mixed with fruit punch) with dark rum or mango liqueur

Unflavored Jello with lemonade and whiskey

Strawberry Jello with light rum and strawberry

liqueur Apricot Jello with amaretto

Lime Jello with Sake

Even though Jello shots taste like candy they each contain as much or more alcohol than a beer, wine or shot.

Posted by mario at 10:22 PM EST
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Jello shot recipe
Tips on the best jello shot making practice

Use ice-cold alcohol.

Use very hot water.

Dissolve 2 regular sized Jello packages or one large packet into 1.5 cups (12 oz) boiling water.

Stir for at least a minute to fully dissolve the gelatin.

Let cool for a few minutes - 10 minutes isn't enough to set up the Jello but it will do a lot to keep the alcohol from evaporating.

Add 1.5 cups (12 oz) of ice cold 80 proof - 40%abv - booze of your choice such as vodka or something more potent if you wish.

Stir and pour into your cups or or glasses. It sets hard in about 1 hour.

Extreme caution is advised since these jello shots contain a lot more alcohol than you might think.

The alcohol must be frozen or dissolved. Jello must be cooled to room temperature.
Failure to adhere to these guide lines will result in the evaporation of all the alcohol before the jello sets.

Although shot glasses look far better and also allow you to see the vibrant colors of the Jello, paper cups allow for the jello shot to be taken a lot easier as they can be turned inside out.

Ice cube trays also work well.

Plastic cups organize quite well in muffin trays, and are easier to handle and serve.

Posted by mario at 10:13 PM EST
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jello shot recipes
Mood:  happy
How to Make Jello Shots
Making Jello shots is like making regular Jello so instead cold water, alcohol is added as well . It is poured into shot glasses or tiny cups instead of bowls.
For a basic lot of jello shots a simple jello shot recipe has been done for you
1 6-ounce package of gelatin - what ever flavor you like
16 ounces (2 cups) boiling water
6 ounces cold water
10 ounces 80-proof Alcohol - 40% or higher
In a bowl they go, you mix boiling water with the powdered gelatin until fully dissolved. let sit for approximately 1 minute to fully dissolve the gelatin. Let the gelatin cool for 5 to 10 minutes. Stir in cold water and alcohol.
Place the shot glasses, molds or cups onto a tray and let the Jello set for two hours in the refrigerator.


Tips
Depending on the proof of alcohol, adjust the ratio of alcohol to cold water to ensure that the jello sets. Use the following ratios:
13 ounces of 30-50 proof alcohol - 20/30% abv - to 3 ounces cold water
10 ounces 80-100 proof alcohol - 40/45% abv - to 6 ounces cold water (U.S. standard)
6 ounces 150-200 proof alcohol - 75/100% abv- to 10 ounces cold water
If you would like more "potent" shots, you can "push" the recipe a bit. This variation makes 6 large cups with 2oz (2x"shots") of alcohol each, or 12 small cups with 1oz of alcohol each, yet still sets hard and tastes great.

Posted by mario at 10:01 PM EST
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Tuesday, 31 October 2006
more on wine
Sangiovese is well renowned for being the main ingredient in many top shelf Italian reds, including Chianti and Brunello di Montalcino, as well as SuperTuscan blends but to name a few. Sangiovese is well known for its adaptable texture and medium or sometimes full bodied spiced flavours, some of which include Raspberries, cherries and anise

Posted by mario at 8:22 PM EST
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Saturday, 28 October 2006
Bartending
Finding a good Bartending School will be the first step towards a rewarding Bartending career! Bartenders at popular nightclubs can make as much as $700 per shift (without getting naked)- which would definitely add up to more than enough to pay the rent and have a decent lift style by just working a few nights a week!


Posted by mario at 8:48 PM EDT
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Wednesday, 25 October 2006
Know your bar
Getting to know any bar is always a hassle, especially with the really busy bars or clubs. The main problems are just where everything is and finding your way around.

The mains things to get you sorted in the bar would be to learn the till and where ur stock is placed, that to me is the hardest part of starting any bartending job and once you have this cold then everything else just falls into place.

Posted by mario at 9:32 PM EDT
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Know your bar
Getting to know any abr is always a hassle, especially with the really busy bars or clubs. The main problems are just where everything is and finding your way around.

The mains things to get you sorted in the bar would be to learn the till and where ur stock is placed, that to me is the hardest part of starting any bartending job and once you have this cold then everything else just falls into place.

Posted by mario at 9:31 PM EDT
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Saturday, 21 October 2006
beer
Beer is a lot older than anyone might think, when we think of how old beer actually is we tend to think it only a few hundred years old, in actual fact it is closer to 6,000 years old.

There is evidence that shows that the ancient Egyptians learnt to make beer even before they learnt to make bread.

One of the main factors that contributed to beers discovery and production was the fact that certain countries could not produce wine so some clever person found that if you make certain ingredients then beer was formed, although it was completely nothing like what we would drink today.

Posted by mario at 8:57 PM EDT
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Alcohol as payment???
People often joke about spending so much money a week on wine or beer that they may as well get paid that way, but roughly 6,000 years ago this was actually the case, employers would pay workers in beer or wine.

This was because at this time alcohol was such a precious commodity that it was prized above almost anything else in the period.

Posted by mario at 8:48 PM EDT
Updated: Saturday, 21 October 2006 8:59 PM EDT
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Thursday, 19 October 2006
Wine temperature
Wine should always be kept at the right temperature be it red, white or rose.

The temperatures for white wine are between 3-5 degrees C, this is to attain maximum drinking pleasure and it also helps alot of the younger wines that dont age well to stay fresh and drinkable.

Red on the other hand should be kept and room temperature this anywhere between 15-18 degrees C, and again it is for maximum enjoyment.
Most reds that are on the market are quite young and are drank rather quickly but those that are not the best way to store red wine is on a rack, on its side and in a fair dark place.

now this does not mean that you need some sort of special equipment a simple rack that you would set on the kitchen counter would be good enough, as long as it was not in direct sunlight, what this design will allow is for the wine to be kept dark because they are surrounded by the other bottles.

It is always best to place wine on its side when storing for lengthy periods of time, 1 of the main reasons for this that some wines over time would have quite a bit of sediment lying in the bottom and it would unpleasant to take the last glass and get a mouthful, so when the bottle is on its side all the sediment is again lying on the side of the bottle, so when the wine is set up right the sediment then just disperse's and the drinker is none the wiser.

Posted by mario at 10:48 PM EDT
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